2000adonline:

Deadly Aim.
Simon Bisley preliminary inks for Prog #1067 from November 2004.

2000adonline:

Deadly Aim.

Simon Bisley preliminary inks for Prog #1067 from November 2004.

So I passed my final BFA jury but the response from the professors was overwhelmingly ‘meh’, but, fuck it, i’m graduating I just want to get out of this place

The Killing Game I

(Source: captainsassistant)

midsnacker:

Judge Dredd #21 (2014)

(via wondygirl)

grapeyguts:

shinkawa you should have known better

(Source: jordanong, via plavskyparticle)

Coco goes to Walgreens (x)

(Source: alaskathunderfunk, via stigs-mexican-cousin)

humansofnewyork:

"Our daughter was five months old when I got a scholarship to Johns Hopkins. My wife came with me to Baltimore so that our family could stay together. I will always be thankful for that sacrifice, because I know it was the toughest three years of her life. She didn’t speak a word of English. We lived in a tiny studio— so tiny that many times I did my studying in the bathroom. In Vietnam, she had a job where she was getting phone calls all day long. But in America, the phone never rang. She wasn’t allowed to work because of visa requirements. Vietnamese holidays were regular days in America, so I’d be in class during New Year and we could never be together. Sometimes when I’d come home from school during wintertime, she’d look at me with tears in her eyes and say: ‘Tuan, I want to go home.’ But she still stayed with me. When I finally got my degree, many of my friends asked if I’d look for a job in the US. But I wouldn’t do that to her. She had done enough for me. So I said: ‘We are going home immediately.’ And as soon as we got back to Vietnam, she was like a fish back in the pond."
(Hanoi, Vietnam)

humansofnewyork:

"Our daughter was five months old when I got a scholarship to Johns Hopkins. My wife came with me to Baltimore so that our family could stay together. I will always be thankful for that sacrifice, because I know it was the toughest three years of her life. She didn’t speak a word of English. We lived in a tiny studio— so tiny that many times I did my studying in the bathroom. In Vietnam, she had a job where she was getting phone calls all day long. But in America, the phone never rang. She wasn’t allowed to work because of visa requirements. Vietnamese holidays were regular days in America, so I’d be in class during New Year and we could never be together. Sometimes when I’d come home from school during wintertime, she’d look at me with tears in her eyes and say: ‘Tuan, I want to go home.’ But she still stayed with me. When I finally got my degree, many of my friends asked if I’d look for a job in the US. But I wouldn’t do that to her. She had done enough for me. So I said: ‘We are going home immediately.’ And as soon as we got back to Vietnam, she was like a fish back in the pond."

(Hanoi, Vietnam)

Uughg thanks so much for the encouragement. Have you ever went into crit knowing you're just the worst artist in the room? Like holy shit that's what's gonna happen today. It's not so much as facing the instructor but facing the judgment of my peers. Weeh.

I have - but listen, you can’t compare yourself to other people.  Ultimately your artwork is about YOUR improvement and YOUR journey.  You can’t compare your performance to that of other people’s, because they’re just different than you and there’s nothing wrong with that.

Focus on your individual improvement and try and take what you can from the other people’s critiques and advice, and tbh, if they’re just being a shitcake and saying shit that is totally not helpful or relevant, give em the stank eye.